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Participant Resources

See What You Missed in 2020

Visit the Learning Center to watch video recordings from previous Annual Meetings. The Opening and Closing Keynote Sessions are public, while other recordings are available only to conference registrants.

AACTE 2020 Opening Session
Robin DiAngelo

AACTE 2020 Closing Session
Rodney Robinson

AACTE 2020 Deeper Dive Sessions
Panelists at AACTE 2020 Annual Meeting

 

 

AACTE Annual Meeting

AACTE Annual Meeting 2021

AACTE 73rd Annual Meeting is going virtual. The safety and health of our members, attendees, and staff is important to AACTE.  Considering the current status of the COVID-19 pandemic, AACTE has made the decision to host a virtual Annual Meeting from February 24 – 26, 2021.

The AACTE Annual Meeting is the premier educator preparation conference in the nation.  The Annual Meeting provides a forum for educators to engage in meaningful discussions, share research and practices, and become better equipped to drive change in the educator preparation field. Join the nationwide conversation on educator preparation’s future, while connecting with thousands of education leaders and suppliers, and let us help you achieve your most ambitious goals by attending our Annual Meeting. This year’s meeting will feature hundreds of education presentations, keynote sessions, a virtual exhibit hall, and networking opportunities.

Take advantage of these benefits of a virtual meeting:

  • Connect from your phone, tablet, laptop, or desktop — from anywhere!
  • No travel expenses. No time away from the classroom.
  • Access to sessions after the event.

Hosting a virtual meeting allows more opportunities for people to attend from around the country to experience AACTE’s signature event.  We hope to “see” you there.

Register Now

Conference Information

Registration Rates

Early Bird
(on or before December 18, 2020)
Advance Registration
(on or before January 22, 2021)
Late Registration
(after January 22, 2021)
Member Rate$349$389$419
Non Member Rate$489$539$589
Emerging Leader †$179$179$179
Student or Holmes Scholar$69$89$109

† EMERGING LEADER Faculty/administrators (assistant/associate professors, department chairs) with five or fewer years of experience in higher education and who have not previously attended AACTE’s Annual Meeting, identified by each institution’s chief representative. Limit 3 per institution. Chief Representatives and members of AACTE committees, including the Board of Directors are not eligible. Learn how to identify Emerging Leaders.


Outstanding Balance Policy

Individuals with an outstanding balance for previous AACTE events will not be permitted to register for upcoming events until their balance is paid. A message indicating what events are unpaid and how to pay will appear when individuals attempt to register. Permission to register will be granted upon receipt of payment. If you have any questions, please contact AACTE Director of Meetings & Events, Linda Minor at lminor@aacte.org.

 

Cancellation Policy

Notice of cancellation or any request for refund of conference registration fees–must be made in writing and received by February 1, 2021. All refund requests received after this date will be denied. A $150.00 administrative fee will be deducted from all cancellation requests. Refund payments will not be processed until after the meeting has concluded.  “No-shows” will not receive a refund. Cancellation and refund requests should be e-mailed to AACTE Senior Manager, Membership Services and Events, Gloriatine Jones at registration@aacte.org. Cancellations over the phone will not be accepted.

 

Substitution Policy

Substitution of registrants is permitted as long as both individuals are from the same institution. Contact Linda Minor at events@aacte.org to request a substitution.

 

AACTE Event Conduct Policy

AACTE is committed to providing a safe, productive, and welcoming environment for all meeting participants and AACTE staff. All participants, including, but not limited to, attendees, speakers, volunteers, exhibitors, AACTE staff members, service providers, and all others are expected to abide by this Virtual Programs Code of Conduct. This Policy applies to all AACTE meeting-related events, including those sponsored by organizations other than AACTE but held in conjunction with AACTE events, on public or private platforms.

AACTE has zero-tolerance for any form of discrimination or harassment, including but not limited to sexual harassment by participants or our staff at our meetings. If you experience harassment or hear of any incidents of unacceptable behavior, AACTE asks that you inform our events team at events@aacte.org so that we can take the appropriate action.

Unacceptable Behavior is defined as:

  • Harassment, intimidation, or discrimination in any form.
  • Verbal abuse of any attendee, speaker, volunteer, exhibitor, AACTE staff member, service provider, or other meeting guest.
  • Examples of verbal abuse include, but are not limited to, verbal comments related to gender, sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance, body size, race, religion, national origin, inappropriate use of nudity and/or sexual images in public spaces or in presentations, or threatening or stalking any attendee, speaker, volunteer, exhibitor, AACTE staff member, service provider, or other meeting guest.
  • Disruption of presentations during sessions, in the exhibit hall, or at other events organized by AACTE throughout the virtual meeting. All participants must comply with the instructions of the moderator and any AACTE virtual event staff.
  • Presentations, postings, and messages should not contain promotional materials, special offers, job offers, product announcements, or solicitation for services. AACTE reserves the right to remove such messages and potentially ban sources of those solicitations.

AACTE reserves the right to take any action deemed necessary and appropriate, including immediate removal from the meeting without warning or refund, in response to any incident of unacceptable behavior, and AACTE reserves the right to prohibit attendance at any future meeting, virtually or in person.

2021 Virtual Annual Meeting at a Glance (subject to change)

All times are EASTERN TIME (ET)

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2021
10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. Affiliate Group Meetings (may require separate registration)
10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.Holmes Programming
12:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.Topical Action Group (TAG) Business Meetings

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2021
9:00 a.m. – 4:15 p.m.Conference Community Center Open (Membership in Here as well)
10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.Learning Labs
11:15 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.Welcome and Opening Keynote
12:45 p.m. – 1:15 p.m. Holmes Poster Sessions
1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.Learning Labs
2:45 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.Learning Labs
4:00 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.Deeper Dive Sessions

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2021
9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Conference Community Center Open
10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.Learning Labs
11:15 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Deeper Dive Sessions
12:45 p.m. – 1:15 p.m. Roundtables – Session One
1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.Learning Labs
2:45 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.AACTE Awards Forum
3:45 p.m. – 4:45 p.m. Learning Labs
5:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. Speaker Spotlight Session

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2020
10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.Learning Labs
11:15 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.Deeper Dive Sessions
12:45 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.Roundtables – Session Two
1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.Closing Keynote

Collectively, we are losing traction in our democracy and experiencing reversals in the civil and human rights that leaders such as Cesar Chavez, Delores Huerta, Martin Luther King, Jr., Rosa Parks, and Harvey Milk all fought to advance. Children are being educated in an environment fraught with violence on our school campuses and in our communities. They are assaulted by guns, words, and legislation that create an unsafe, hateful, and fearful climate. We are living in a time when children are taken from their families, retained in deplorable circumstances, and denied access to basic needs and education. The term “all” seems to only mean some, and people who speak out against these injustices are attacked by words and actions.

As educators, our unique lens allows us the opportunity to witness, document, and take action against these inequities in real time. We know efforts exist to mobilize teachers, administrators, counselors, and psychologists to address issues related to trauma associated with violence, forced separation of immigrant families, disparate policing policies, and intolerance to the LGB and Trans* community. We also know that people of color, students with disabilities, and individuals from low‐income communities are disproportionately impacted by punitive classroom and disciplinary practices. These individuals have unequal access to high quality teachers, which is the best predictor of school success. Apathy andbcomplacency have allowed de facto segregation along racial, ethnic, linguistic, ability, geographic, and
socio‐economic lines at levels that exceed legally‐enforced segregation policies of the past, thus entrenching inequalities in schools.

In our profession, we have long realized the strength, beauty, and power of local communities. However, we must continue to promote ways to raise consciousness and use our professional knowledge to collectively build upon these assets. It is time that we, as educators, become the driving force to lead collaboratively in addressing the challenges facing PK‐20 students and the communities in which they live. As individuals and as part of a professional  community, we must set aside our differences and apply our collective wisdom to establish a new paradigm in educator preparation. The imperative is ours to create an empowered mindset, to renew democracy, and to respond to an entrenched system of inequities and fear. The 2021 AACTE Annual Meeting invites you to join in this united effort to resist hate, and restore hope, by Engaging in Courageous Actions.

Strand I: Equity and Inclusivity in Preparation and Practice
Schools serve individuals and communities with diverse perspectives and needs, and educators must be prepared to work in this complex environment. Inclusion and equity are overarching principles that should guide all educational policies, preparation programs, and practices. To do so effectively, educators must recognize the principle that education, particularly in an inclusive democracy, is both a fundamental right and the foundation for more equitable, inclusive, and cohesive communities. Ensuring that all learners have access to quality education acknowledges the intrinsic value of diversity and respect for human dignity. principles of inclusion and equity are not only about ensuring access to education, but also about the educational spaces themselves. Quality learning spaces and pedagogies enable students to thrive, understand their realities, and work for a more just and democratic society. Therefore, it is important to find ways of addressing the needs of the most underserved students that do not necessarily demand extra funding and additional resources. The purpose of this strand is to share innovative perspectives, orientations, strategies, and technologies designed to address equity and inclusivity among diverse groups of learners and school contexts.

Strand II: Activism for Renewing Democracy
Schools serve individuals and communities with diverse perspectives and needs, and educators must be prepared to work in this complex environment. Inclusion and equity are overarching principles that should guide all educational policies, preparation programs, and practices. To do so effectively, educators must recognize the principle that education, particularly in an inclusive democracy, is both a fundamental right and the foundation for more equitable, inclusive, and cohesive communities. Ensuring that all learners have access to quality education acknowledges the intrinsic value of diversity and respect for human dignity. principles of inclusion and equity are not only about ensuring access to education, but also about the educational spaces themselves. Quality learning spaces and pedagogies enable students to thrive, understand their realities, and work for a more just and democratic society. Therefore, it is important to find ways of addressing the needs of the most underserved students that do not necessarily demand extra funding and additional resources. The purpose of this strand is to share innovative perspectives, orientations, strategies, and technologies designed to address equity and inclusivity among diverse groups of learners and school contexts.

Strand III: Establishing a Sustainable and Diverse Profession
Schools serve individuals and communities with diverse perspectives and needs, and educators must be prepared to work in this complex environment. Inclusion and equity are overarching principles that should guide all educational policies, preparation programs, and practices. To do so effectively, educators must recognize the principle that education, particularly in an inclusive democracy, is both a fundamental right and the foundation for more equitable, inclusive, and cohesive communities. Ensuring that all learners have access to quality education acknowledges the intrinsic value of diversity and respect for human dignity. principles of inclusion and equity are not only about ensuring access to education, but also about the educational spaces themselves. Quality learning spaces and pedagogies enable students to thrive, understand their realities, and work for a more just and democratic society. Therefore, it is important to find ways of addressing the needs of the most underserved students that do not necessarily demand extra funding and additional resources. The purpose of this strand is to share innovative perspectives, orientations, strategies, and technologies designed to address equity and inclusivity among diverse groups of learners and school contexts.

Strand IV: Clinical Practice and Community Engagement
As our democracy has been challenged, our schools, communities, and educator preparation programs have had to be nimble in the ways they continue to meet student needs. Educator preparation programs, in collaboration with schools and communities, remain the most effective ways to prepare educators. Educator preparation, and the time our candidates spend in clinical experiences, is complex and nuanced work. Clinical experiences that are thoughtfully designed and supported by school and university stakeholders result in educators who are confident, learner‐ready, and contextually aware. As such, the importance of sustained and supervised practice with resilient models of evidence‐based pedagogy is more important than ever. The purpose of this strand is to explore, expand, and inspire new ideas about effective, clinically‐rich partnerships in educator preparation. This strand investigates what we know about clinical practice and community participation, but also invites the opportunity for us to engage in courageous conversations that challenge the status quo.

AACTE holds its Annual Meeting each year in late February/early March each year.  This is the premier educator preparation conference in the nation.  The Annual Meeting provides a forum for educators to engage in meaningful discussions, share research and practices, and become better equipped to drive change in the educator preparation field. Join the nationwide conversation on educator preparation’s future, while connecting with over 2,000 education leaders and suppliers, and let us help you achieve your most ambitious goals by attending our Annual Meeting.

Questions? Contact us at events@aacte.org.


72nd Annual Meeting Recap Videos

We thank each of you who joined us for the 72nd Annual Meeting in Atlanta, GA! Attendees can view highlights and video recordings of the General Sessions and all Deeper Dives by accessing the AACTE Resource Library.

AACTE’s 2020 Annual Meeting Video Recap (Day 1)

AACTE’s 2020 Annual Meeting Video Recap (Day2)

AACTE’s 72nd Annual Meeting – Wrap Video

AACTE Staff 72nd Annual Meeting Video


Future Annual Meetings

2022 – March 4-6, New Orleans Marriott | New Orleans, LA

2023 – February 25-27, JW Marriott Indianapolis | Indianapolis, IN

Annual Meeting Site Selection Procedures

AACTE considers many factors in determining its future locations for the Annual Meeting, which brings together over 2,000 individuals in the educator preparation field each year. These factors include but are not limited to geographic and cultural diversity, attendee cost, available meeting space, and social justice considerations.

The following priorities guide Annual Meeting site selection:

Location

  1. Selection of a site 4-5 years in advance.
  2. Rotation among U.S. regions, with at least one western region destination every five years.
  3. Urban destination with accessible airlift, affordable airfare, and local travel infrastructure.
  4. Available dates that coincide with AACTE’s preferred time frame of late February or early March.
  5. Favorable antidiscrimination and accessibility policies, including those related to race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, religion, physical ability, health conditions, socioeconomic status, and marital, domestic, or parental status.
  6. Presence of AACTE members in the vicinity of the destination.

Facilities/Space

  1. Adequate amount of meeting rooms, exhibit areas, and other space to meet the Annual Meeting’s needs.
  2. Accessibility of facilities/space.
  3. Compact Annual Meeting footprint.
  4. Proximity of hotel partners.
  5. Transportation logistics and cost.
  6. Sizeable block of rooms available at primary hotels.

Cost/Affordability

  1. Guest room rates.
  2. Complimentary facilities or services provided.
  3. Rental rates for facilities.
  4. Food and beverage expenditure requirements.
  5. Labor expenses.
  6. Audio/visual rental costs.
  7. Incentives offered by either the destination or its subsidiary partners.
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